• I know the dark matter type. Most of my colleagues are dark matter developers. The problem with any kind of dark matter is that it tends to remain dark, because it’s “weakly interactive”. Many of those developers are no Digital Natives and they don’t use social networks which are the main communication channel of the online communities.
    Therefore it’s not an easy task to get them into the community. You can send them links to blog posts that may be of interest to the team (I often blog about topics that have come up at work), but that won’t draw them into the community. They may or may not read the linked post, and return to that inert state where online communities don’t matter. Sadly, those dark matter developers often are the ones who could really benefit from reading what is up in the communities.

    • Rob Irving

      Most of my colleague’s are Dark Matter Developers as well. It’s a bit of a self perpetuating problem since the most likely way for someone to be introduced to the community is through colleagues at work. For that reason I do think awareness is important. There are some developers who would become more active if they knew user groups and code camps were out there.

  • I know the dark matter type. Most of my colleagues are dark matter developers. The problem with any kind of dark matter is that it tends to remain dark, because it’s “weakly interactive”. Many of those developers are no Digital Natives and they don’t use social networks which are the main communication channel of the online communities.
    Therefore it’s not an easy task to get them into the community. You can send them links to blog posts that may be of interest to the team (I often blog about topics that have come up at work), but that won’t draw them into the community. They may or may not read the linked post, and return to that inert state where online communities don’t matter. Sadly, those dark matter developers often are the ones who could really benefit from reading what is up in the communities.